MY COUSIN THE SAINT
A Search for Faith, Family, and Miracles
by Justin Calanoso

Posts Tagged ‘“Washington Post”’

Now in paperback

Tuesday, June 16th, 2009

My Cousin the Saint
Released today, by Harper Perennial. Available here. Take a look inside here.

What would St. Patrick do?

Tuesday, March 17th, 2009

From the On Faith column in the Washington Post:

“The Bishop of Scranton threatened to cancel mass during Saturday’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade, one of the largest in the country, if organizers honored “an abortion-rights supporter” — ostensibly Vice President and Scranton-native Joe Biden. They didn’t and he didn’t.

“But the controversy threatened to divorce the Church from politicians who enforce laws permitting abortions. Since Catholic officeholders are sworn to respect the constitution, the bishop’s decree would have effectively kept all those kind of law-abiding Irish-American Catholics out of the Church on St. Patrick’s Day. Its arguable whether the threat advanced the coming of God’s Kingdom. However, it goes against tradition.” The rest of the story is here.

Italian-American at Homeland Security?

Friday, November 21st, 2008

Washington, 20 Nov. (AKI) – United States president-elect Barack Obama is eyeing the western state of Arizona’s governor and rising Democratic star, Janet Napolitano, as his Secretary of Homeland Security, according to Democratic Party sources quoted on Thursday by the Washington Post newspaper. Napolitano, 50 was an early supporter of Obama and won accolades from fellow governors for her handling of immigration issues, the paper said.

Full story here.

A Catholic shift to Obama?

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2008

Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne Jr. poses that question in this commentary.

Excerpt: “It has become commonplace in American politics: Certain Roman Catholic bishops declare that the faithful should cast their ballots on the basis of a limited number of “nonnegotiable issues,” notably opposition to abortion. Conservative Catholics cheer, more liberal Catholics howl. And that is usually the end of the story.

” Not this year. Catholics, who are quintessential swing voters and gave narrow but crucial support to Presidenti Bush in 2004, are drifting toward Barack Obama. And this time, some church leaders are suggesting that single-issue voting is by no means a Catholic commandment.”

Sarah Palin: fact and fiction

Saturday, September 13th, 2008

Sarah Palin has made her conservative faith and ideological beliefs a prominant campaign issue. She was selected in part because of those beliefs, which appeal so strongly to the Republican base which neither likes nor trusts John McCain, who has long been a moderate on most issues until a few months ago. As more information comes out regarding the real Sarah Palin, it’s important for eveyone to consider her candidacy very carefully.

On the New York Times web site now: “Ms. Palin walks the national stage as a small-town foe of “good old boy” politics and a champion of ethics reform. The charismatic 44-year-old governor draws enthusiastic audiences and high approval ratings. And as the Republican vice-presidential nominee, she points to her management experience while deriding her Democratic rivals, Senators Barack Obama and Joe Biden as speechmakers who never have run anything.

“But an examination of her swift rise and record as mayor of Wasilla and then governor finds that her visceral style and penchant for attacking critics — she sometimes calls local opponents “haters” — contrasts with her carefully crafted public image.

“Throughout her political career, she has pursued vendettas, fired officials who crossed her and sometimes blurred the line between government and personal grievance, according to a review of public records and interviews with 60 Republican and Democratic legislators and local officials.”

The entire story is here.

UPDATE: And this from the Washington Post today: “Palin says her time as mayor taught her how to be a leader and grounded her in the real needs of voters, and her tenure revealed some of the qualities she would later display as governor: a striving ambition, a willingness to cut loose those perceived as disloyal and a populist brand of social and pro-growth conservatism.

“But a visit to this former mining supply post 40 miles north of Anchorage shows the extent to which Palin’s mayoralty was also defined by what it did not include. The universe of the mayor of Wasilla is sharply circumscribed even by the standards of small towns, which limited Palin’s exposure to issues such as health care, social services, the environment and education.”

Family values and other contradictions

Monday, September 1st, 2008

In her On Faith column in the Washington Post, Sally Quinn offers some compelling reading on the controversy of the day. An excerpt:

Salley Quinn“My first reaction was shock. Then anger. John McCain chose a running mate simply because she is a woman and one who appealed to the Republican’s conservative evangelical base. Now, with news that Palin’s 17-year-old unmarried daughter is pregnant, McCain’s pick may not even find support among “family values” voters.”  Read the whole story here.

The Los Angeles Times today reports other contradictions. “But under her leadership, the state of Alaska has requested 31 earmarks worth $197.8 million in next year’s federal budget, according to the website of Sen. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska), the former chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee.”

Washington Post

Monday, June 2nd, 2008

The Washington Post today writes a long and involved story on Pope John Paul II’s cause for canonization. Most people, even Catholics, have no idea how long and involved this meticulous process is. One of the Post’s Vatican sources, Monsignor Robert Sarno in the Congregation for the Causes of Saints, was a source for me as well in my own Vatican research. I devote a chapter to the ages-old process of naming saints.

UPDATE: United Press International adds more to the story. Others are blogging about JPII and sainthood here and here and here, and finally, here.